Week 18: For My Child

Clothes I’m saving for my child:

Levi’s. Because we’ve travelled together: they’re vintage Levis from Thailand. Have to be cool. Accept might not be.  But then I can see if they fit me.

Sand embroidered grey trousers.  Because they’re embroidered drainpipes and they’re beautiful and unusual and I want to offer this.

Miss Sixty denim high button-waisted with braces. because I wore it on the Wolf and my first date which I hope is romantic, and because the style is so of its time, which could be interesting.

Blue silk summer evening dress, H&M. Because it reminds me of a pink summer evening dress embroidered with white flowers my mum wore when I was a little girl.

Plum satin and matte 1930s style evening dress. Because the Wolf bought it for me, and I’ve not had the chance to wear it.

Black stretch velvet, sweetheart, strapless dress with thigh-high split.  Because I was Plenty O’Toole in this, aged 17, and because Grannico (my mum’s Granny name) gave it to me.

Coast slate blue fitted stretch dress, knee length, with ice blue sash. Because she might not want parrots peeking out of bright flowers, Bond girls, the thirties or braces.

Black, velvet vintage St Michael pencil skirt, with side pockets.  Because I first met the Wolf wearing this.

Red, midi, leather pencil skirt.  Because it’s a red, midi, leather pencil skirt and they don’t come around very often … much like the electric blue leather A-line.

Sky blue velvet A-line mini.  No reason other than a strong instinct to keep it for her.

Thai silk, tailor made evening dress.  Because she can adapt the material into her own bespoke outfit.

Backless, vintage LBD. Because it is unusual and classic.

Bronze, vintage Topshop hotpants.  Because they’re the kind of thing I’d have wanted to pinch from my mum.

Blue satin, Chinese-style, long-sleeved, embroidered top, adapted by my mum.  Because  Grannico’s hands have made it more beautiful.

Royal blue, Yves Saint Laurent, vintage silk tee-shirt and Shanghai Tang pink and cream silk top, with cherry blossoms.  Because both, I hope, will be a sort of investment.

 

By Sara Nesbitt Gibbons